1.5 Years in Ecuador

To celebrate a year and a half in Ecuador, we thought we’d take a look back at what has changed for us since we left our lives in the United States.

THEN NOW
“On time” meant arriving at the scheduled time or 15 minutes early. “On time” means arriving 1 hour after the scheduled time.
Hot showers were plentiful and taken for granted. A bucket bath with warm water feels luxurious.
There was no one to greet us when we arrived home after a long day. Max, our biggest fan, shows us just how much he missed us.
We ate half of our meals at restaurants or out of take-out containers. Mari cooks almost all meals and the only delivery option is Palmar Pizza.
Entertainment ranged from dinner parties to concerts and art events. Entertainment consists of watching movies, reading, and holiday parties.
Cold meant snow, ice, hats, gloves, and wind that chilled you to the bone. Cold is any day when the sun isn’t shining.
Going to the beach was a novel weekend or vacation destination. Going to the beach means walking outside our door.
Work was a 9-5 (or 9-9) commitment that took place in an office at a desk. Work means setting our own hours and can take place anywhere.
Commuting was walking or taking the NYC subway to work. Commuting means waiting for a bus that makes stops anywhere.
We planned projects for weeks (if not months) in advance. Projects come together at the last minute and somehow still work out.
Food shopping meant walking next door to the Trader Joe’s. Food shopping means traveling over an hour to the only big supermarket.
Lunch could fit into a paper bag and might consist of a sandwich and fruit. Ecuadorian lunch consists of soup, rice, chicken/fish, juice, and dessert.
Rice was a side dish usually prepared with Asian or Mexican food. Failure to serve rice at every meal warrants comments.
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3 responses to “1.5 Years in Ecuador”

  1. Jena says :

    Can’t believe you’ve been there a year and a half already! Crazy! Miss you!

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